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The one resolution that must make your list this new year

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"Tell your story..." prompts this editor by Medium. I will.

That's mostly what I do these days. As a non-technical co-founder at a tech startup, I'm often asked what my team composition is. It's easy to introduce the tech guy and the designer. People understand tech and think they understand design. What they don't understand is 'people.'

I handle the 'people' side of a tech startup. As odd as that may seem, it is what I do. I talk to users, customers, potential partners and investors as well as random strangers who have the misfortune of being within my earshot during commutes. If I meet you randomly, I can't tell you about our traction so far or our projections for 2016. That will make you get bored. Heck, that'll make me get bored. I tell them stories. I tell them about how it all started. I tell them about our recent involvement in a lovely couple's fairytale wedding. I ask them if they had a party, wedding or some ceremony in the recent past and this always leads to exactly what I am looking for: a story. Well, usually I'm looking for a list of the pain points they faced when they were trying to plan and manage the event so that we can learn and improve Eventosaur. A story does that job in a supremely interesting fashion.

Me with my mom in 1991

Yes, that was me. I was chubby. Can I move on with my story? So, what you see there is me when I was a little over a year old I think. I started talking pretty early and my parents lived in Kolar — a small town away from Bangalore. There was no creche or play home there so they decided to send me to a school instead. I sat in a class with kids thrice my age and learnt the letters of the alphabet and rhymes (I think.)

Every day, when I got back home my mom would ask me one simple question. This one little habit of hers has shaped my entire life. She'd ask "What happened today? Tell me everything." So I would. I'd recount the entire day and everything that happened around me. The classes, the fights, what I learnt, who I spoke to, what I ate, where I went ...all of it.

Eventually, I figured out that I had to make these stories interesting for her to listen to and for me to tell. Now, I know what you're thinking, but making stuff up doesn’t work for 25 years straight. Yes, we do this even to this day. So, the only way for me to ensure that the time my mom spends listening to my stories is worth it is by living my life in a way that makes for an interesting tale. No matter where I am, I call her up at the end of the day and tell her some stories. If I'm at home, this happens in the kitchen or on the dining table.

Storytelling is a gift that never stops giving.

Want to chat up someone from the opposite gender? Don't use pick up lines. Tell a story.

Want to get a world-class mentor to give you her time? Tell her your story.

Want to land an amazing job? Tell a story.

Want to convince your friend to quit his job and start up with you? Tell your story.

The list goes on. You get the point though. Live life in a way that makes for a great story and while you're at it, share it with others so that they can laugh, cry, smile and celebrate with you.

At Eventosaur, we have a very simple policy when things start to look bad or great. We pause for a moment and think of that movie they're going to make about us in the future. Will this moment get any screen-time at all? If it does, how long? Once those questions are answered our reactions are determined.

So, if there's one resolution you make this new year let it be that in 366 days, you'll have told some amazing people 366 beautiful stories. May the force be with you.


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